Office 365 ProPlus Administrator Series: Client Deployment Options

Author: Jeremy_MSFT Originally published to the Office 365 Preview blog. Office 365 ProPlus offers flexible software delivery options to suit organizations of all sizes and desktop service architectures. From small businesses where users often install their own software, to large enterprises where hundreds of applications are centrally delivered by the IT department to every user, Office 365 ProPlus installation adapts to your processes and workflows. Install Office 365 ProPlus from the Internet Self-installation of Office 365 ProPlus allows users to install Office on their personal PCs directly from www.office365.com . After the administrator has created the user account, the user can log in to the Office 365 service and install Office 365 ProPlus. Users will need to be local administrators on their PCs when self-installing and the installation will always be the most up-to-date Office build and be enabled to receive automatic updates. When the user initiates the installation, a small setup file (roughly 400 KB) is downloaded and run from the local PC the filename (for example: Setup.X86.en-us_ProPlusRetail_56f7d927-5bf8-435e-a240-9eaeef2f53c5_.exe) contains the installation parameters and what is loaded from the content delivery network site ( http://officecdn.microsoft.com/ ) where Office installation files are stored. Software installation page in Office 365 Self-installation may be appropriate in certain organizations where users have administrative privileges and are expected to install their own software. Self-installation rights may also be provided in well-managed organizations where users by definition cannot install software on managed computers, but are given access to Office 365 ProPlus installation on home or personal PCs. Administrators may also centrally disable the right for user self-installation, but this is a global control within the Office 365 Admin Portal and will apply to all users in the tenant. Process for managed self-installation or home and personal device installation in a managed environment In the process flow above, the IT administrator may optionally define Office configurations using local configuration management tools like Group Policy prior to publishing self-installation steps to end users. End users will be responsible for installing any required add-ins, dependent applications or standardized Office templates if needed and in the self-installation scenario, users are by default configured to receive automatic monthly updates from the Office 365 service. Automated Deployments using Software Distribution Infrastructure Most large organizations use enterprise software distribution or image-based deployment automation to install software on behalf of their users. Office 365 ProPlus enables these tools and processes to install Office either from the network or with support from the Office 365 online service. As with the download process the Office Deployment Tool uses setup.exe to install and configure Office 365 ProPlus. These tools are designed with flexibility in mind so an administrator can point the setup engine at local, network or Web-based file sources. The configuration XML file governs the installation process to determine what products, architectures, languages, and versions are installed and from which sources. It also allows the administrator to suppress installation and first run experiences, accept licensing agreements on behalf of the user, determine where installation logs are stored, enable or disable automatic software updates and configure where Office looks for updates. Process for on-premises software delivery of Office 365 ProPlus With these tools you can follow classic enterprise software distribution approaches where software installation files are installed via local cache or directly from the management or distribution point. New to Office 365 ProPlus is the ability to distribute just the setup.exe file and instruct that Office Click-to-Run packages are installed from the Office 365 online service ( http://officecdn.microsoft.com/ ). This is a great scenario in off-LAN situations when VPN connectivity to a management point is slower than the target machine’s connection to the Internet. Because installations are usually much faster than with previous MSI-based packages, deploying Office pre-installed in a custom Windows image will not save as much time as with previous Office releases and it allows you to pre-cache Office Click-to-Run builds with multiple language support within a captured Windows image (WIM) file, then use scripting automation or your favorite task sequencing engine to install Office directly from the local file source within the WIM file. It is also recommended to install Office native to the language of the operating system as opposed to using language packs atop the EN-US installation of Office, but both options are still possible with Office 365 ProPlus and Click-to-Run. The configuration XML file governs both what is downloaded and how Office Click-to-Run is applied to the target computer. The controls relevant to using setup.exe /configure are the following. Option Description Sample Syntax Add Parent control to determine source, architecture, product and languages to download. From local folder:               From local network:               Remove Used to uninstall Office products.                                 Product Multiple products may be nested under the control and multiple languages may be nested under the control. Office 365 ProPlus      SourcePath Location where the Office is installed from. If SourcePath is unspecified, setup will first look for installation source in the local folder and if not present it will look to the CDN source. OfficeClientEdition Determines the architecture of the product to download, 32 or 64 bit. Note: 32-bit is still the recommended architecture for new Office versions. Cross-architecture installations are not permitted; if a 32-bit Office version is already installed on a system, the 64-bit Click-to-Run package will not install and vice versa.   Or: OfficeClientEdition=”32″ OfficeClientEdition=”64″ Language Language determines the language DAT files to be downloaded with the Click-to-Run package. Updates Configures automatic updating behavior. Updates may be either from the public Office 365 service, local location, local file share or private http:// site. To use a local file share: To use the CDN:   

The Latest on Lync-Skype Connectivity

Last week Microsoft announced that Lync-Skype connectivity for presence, IM, and voice will be available to all Lync users by June. Today a follow-up article was published on the Lync Team Blog that provides additional details, as well as answers to the most frequently asked questions. For the full story, see Lync-Skype Connectivity Arriving by June .

The Latest on Lync-Skype Connectivity

Last week Microsoft announced that Lync-Skype connectivity for presence, IM, and voice will be available to all Lync users by June. Today a follow-up article was published on the Lync Team Blog that provides additional details, as well as answers to the most frequently asked questions. For the full story, see Lync-Skype Connectivity Arriving by June .

Yammer Momentum – February 2013

Exciting press release published yesterday as well as a set or articles on Yammer’s momentum, also please check Yammer’s newly designed customer success page: https://www.yammer.com/customers   Yammer Accelerates Momentum Following Microsoft Acquisition Sample of articles published on February 20th: Yammer tops 7M users, sales spike after Microsoft deal – GeekWire, Todd Bishop Microsoft: Yammer Generates Big Business After Buy – eWeek, Pedro Hernandez Yammer has 7 million users as SharePoint integration continues – CITEworld, Matt Rosoff Yammer Touts Record Year – Seattle Times, Janet Tu  

Yammer Momentum – February 2013

Exciting press release published yesterday as well as a set or articles on Yammer’s momentum, also please check Yammer’s newly designed customer success page: https://www.yammer.com/customers   Yammer Accelerates Momentum Following Microsoft Acquisition Sample of articles published on February 20th: Yammer tops 7M users, sales spike after Microsoft deal – GeekWire, Todd Bishop Microsoft: Yammer Generates Big Business After Buy – eWeek, Pedro Hernandez Yammer has 7 million users as SharePoint integration continues – CITEworld, Matt Rosoff Yammer Touts Record Year – Seattle Times, Janet Tu  

Preparing for the Next SharePoint Online Service Update

Microsoft is preparing to roll out the new SharePoint Online as a part of Office 365. As a result of this initial phase of the SharePoint Online service update, you may be affected by some of the design changes. Below is a consolidated list of items with pointers to documented fixes and posted workarounds: Install SharePoint Designer 2013 (free download here ). Previous versions of SharePoint Designer are not compatible with the new SharePoint Online. Apply the Hotfix for SharePoint Designer 2013 to work properly with InfoPath 2010 – start here . Apply the Hotfix for SharePoint Workspace 2010 to work properly with the new SharePoint Online – start here. In addition to the above items, there are several known issues previously posted here that Microsoft is working on to resolve in real-time. These issues are not broadly impactful and most have a corresponding knowledge base (KB) article with posted manual solution steps.     Note that you will not yet have access to the new SharePoint features or the new user interface. Rather, during this preparation phase, you will only see the new enhancements to the Office Web Apps as we previous communicated here . In addition, we’d like to reiterate Office 365 no longer supports Internet Explorer 7 (IE7).   Some CRM Online customers are also impacted within this phase of the SharePoint Online service update. Please review the in-depth blog post that articulates the recommended “list component” fix here .   Thank you, The SharePoint Online Team    * The Office 365 ProPlus Preview can run side-by-side with previous versions of Office. Users who have use rights to Office as a subscription will have the use rights to final Office 2013 RTM once available and no longer need the Preview version.

Understanding the Access Denied Error Message when Mapping a Network Drive to SharePoint Online

  by Brian Petersen, MSFT SharePoint Online provides users the ability to map a network drive to a document library allowing a user to navigate to and open files directly from Windows Explorer. This blog is intended to direct users to a Knowledge Base article that’s been published to help not only setup and configure mapped network drives, but also address common issues and steps to resolve.  In the More Information section of this blog you’ll see a link to the KB Article, but you’ll also see more details around the most common scenario we see in support.  Note This blog and the KB article do not apply to Microsoft Office 365 for professionals and small businesses.   More information: The Knowledge Base article entitled “How to configure and to troubleshoot mapped network drives that connect to SharePoint Online sites in Office 365 for enterprises” can be found here: KB2616712 . Ensure all the steps are completed in the KB, but also note the comment about the cookie expiring in the first set of solution steps. The comment in the KB states “Be aware that the cookie will eventually time out”. Certainly, having the WebClient started in your client machine’s Services, along with adding your SharePoint site to the Trusted Sites Zone of your Internet Explorer browser, are both important solutions to Mapped Drive issues. However, you will continue to encounter an Access Denied error periodically – mainly after rebooting the computer or when you haven’t logged in (authenticated) to SharePoint Online over an extended period of time, generally 8 hours., One common scenario is when a user locks the computer at the end of the workday, returns the next day, and logs in to their work computer. If that worker tries to access the mapped drive he or she will get the following error. Path is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if you have access permissions. Access Denied. Before opening files in this location, you must first add the web site to your trusted site list, browse to the web site, and select the option to login automatically’ The user receives this error because the session cookie  for SharePoint Online has expired and must be “refreshed” in order to successfully access the mapped network drive again.            

Project Online: How do I re-use an unwanted PWA instance

If you have used or are still kicking the tires of the Office 365 Preview and Project Online you may have noticed that you can have up to 3 PWA instances.  The first one is provisioned for you as the …/Sites/PWA instance, and you can then either use the New > Private Site Collection with Project Web App option to add a new site collection with PWA, or you can use the Project Web App > Add option to add the feature to an existing site collection.  Once you have used all three your SharePoint admin center may look something like this: The red bar in top right signifying that you have used all your available PWA instances.  In the preview we have seen that customers wanting to start afresh with a clean PWA have deleted the site collections and then still not been able to re-use this apparently deleted PWA instance.  The reason behind this is that the instance isn’t gone – it is in the recycle bin – and you could actually recover it if you needed to.  So how should you remove a PWA instance if you want to recover the quota to re-use somewhere else?  We have this documented over on the Office site (thanks Sonia! – and if the link isn’t live it soon will be…) and the key take-away is that you should use the Project Web App > Remove option.  This removes the feature from the selected site collection and gives you back one of your quota instances.  But what if I have already deleted the site collection?  The answer to that question is covered on the link given too – but I’m also going to cover the steps here as well as introducing the concept of administering your SharePoint Online instance via PowerShell. So my scenario is that I have deleted two of my site collections that had PWA instances – so still see that I have used my quota of 3 – what do I do next?  For the first recovery I will use the option to restore my PWA and then remove properly.  So looking in my Recycle Bin from the ribbon I can see my two sites (if I had deleted more than 30 days ago they would be gone anyway – and my quota would have been returned) – and I select the first one and click Restore Deleted Items – and then click Restore on the next dialog..   In my testing the restore took just a few minutes – but my PWA was pretty empty.  Once it was back I could select the site collection and use the option Project Web App > Remove, and then click Disable in the next dialog to disable this feature (and we really are sorry to see you remove PWA…). After this completes, which again for me was just a minute or two, I can see that I now have 1 PWA instance available to re-use – and I still have the …/Sites/PWS site collection.  This is important to note – I have disabled PWA which deleted all Project Web App data, including project plans, timesheets and resources – but I still have any pure SharePoint content that may have also existed in that site collection. For my remaining PWA instance that is still in the recycle bin I am going to take a different approach – and thanks to my colleague Stefan Schwarz for coming up with this workaround.  PowerShell is a tool that can be used across many and probably nearly all current Microsoft products.  For current Office 365 there is a good article at http://onlinehelp.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-enterprises/hh124998.aspx and for the commands we are interested in you will also need the SharePoint Online Management Shell from http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35588 You will also need to install the Microsoft Online Services Sign-in Assistant as noted in the first article. I prefer using the ISE for PowerShell – so I start this up and then load the SharePoint Online cmdlets using import-module Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell (installed from the link above) then connect to my SharePoint Online instance using Connect-SPOService and entering my Tenant admin url and then my credentials.  This isn’t just your tenant url but your tenant admin url – for example mine is https://BlogFodder-admin.sharepoint.com . I can then use the command Get-SPODeletedSite to see what is in my recycle bin: and to completely remove it I can use another PowerShell command – Remove-SPODeletedSite, along with the Url of the site I wish to remove – and to be extra cautious I can use the –Confirm parameter to give me that last chance to change my mind – and I then even get another last chance with the Permanently removing site dialog… Once this completes then I did notice it took a couple of minutes and a refresh or two before I could see my available PWA instances count go up to 2. Remember, the Remove-SPODeletedSite  isn’t just removing the Project stuff – but will completely delete everything to do with that site collection.  But hey – it was in your recycle bin so I guess you thought you could do without it.  Again, the link to the Office site gives a good breakdown of the options to use and what the consequences of your actions will be. The SharePoint Online Management Shell isn’t a total replacement for the SharePoint admin center UI – for example you can’t administer PWA instances and features – but it may offer some useful features such as user administration.  Another good reference to help understand the differences between the Office 365 and SharePoint Online PowerShell commands is http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fp161388.aspx .  I can see that the PowerShell stuff for Project and SharePoint online will be generating a few more blog posts. Thanks to Jean Donati and Sonia Atchison for feedback on this article – and Doug Welsby for running into the problem and getting us thinking about documenting the issue – and Stefan Schwarz for the PowerShell commands.

Installing the Project 2013 SDK download on Windows 8

The Project 2013 SDK download is updated for the RTM release of Project 2013. In addition to articles, references, and code samples that are updated from the July release of Project 2013 Preview, the SDK also includes a local copy of VBA Help for Project Standard and Project Professional. You can install the downloaded Project2013SDK.msi file on computers that are running Windows 8, Windows 7 (and a couple of earlier Windows releases), Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2012. When you install the SDK on a Windows 7 machine, the SDK contents are accessible from the Start menu. Figure 1 shows, for example, that the Microsoft SDKs folder contains the Project 2013 SDK folder, which contains links to three files. From the hierarchical context of the Start menu, it is clear that the Documentation node is contained in the Project 2013 SDK folder. Similarly, if you install the SharePoint 2013 SDK download and the Apps for Office and SharePoint SDK download , they each create a folder in Microsoft SDKs , and each SDK has a Documentation node within its folder. Figure 1. Using the Project 2013 SDK from the Windows 7 Start menu The problem Windows 8 does not have a Start menu, it has two related Start screens. After you install the Project 2013 SDK download, and scroll the main Start screen to the links for the installed files, you can see the same three links as in Windows 7. (To see the Welcome Guide on the Start screen, you can search for Welcome.rtf , open it in Internet Explorer, and then pin Welcome Guide to the Start screen.) But , the Start screen in Windows 8 is not arranged in hierarchical folders. In Figure 2, it is not clear what the Documentation link is for. Figure 2. Using the Documentation link to the Project 2013 SDK, on the Windows 8 Start screen The problem is worse if you also install the SharePoint 2013 SDK and the Apps for Office and SharePoint 2013 SDK. You would then have three Documentation links and three Welcome Guide links, each of which goes to a different SDK. If you right-click one of the Start screen icons, the icon shows a check mark, and the Start screen shows options at the bottom (see Figure 2). If you choose All apps at the bottom right of the screen, Windows 8 shows lists of installed apps within top-level groups. For example, the Microsoft SDKs group contains links for all of the Office, Project, and SharePoint SDKs that you install; there are no subfolders to distinguish which links go to which SDK. In Figure 3, only the Project 2013 SDK is installed, and the links have the same names as in Figure 2. Figure 3. Using the Project 2013 SDK links in the Apps view, in Windows 8 The workaround (for now) On a machine with Windows 8, you can install one SDK at a time, and then rename the links on the Start screen, before installing another SDK. To install Office, Project, and SharePoint SDKs on Windows 8 Log on to Windows 8 as an administrator. Install, for example, the Project 2013 SDK. On the Start screen, right-click the Documentation icon, and then choose Open file location at the bottom of the screen. On the Windows Desktop, rename the Documentation link as Project 2013 SDK Documentation , and then choose Continue in the File Access Denied dialog box (see Figure 4). Figure 4. Renaming the Project 2013 SDK links in the Desktop view Similarly, rename the VBA Reference link as Project 2013 VBA Reference , and rename the Welcome Guide link as Project 2013 Welcome Guide . With the mouse pointer in the lower-left corner of the screen, choose the Start pop-up icon, and then scroll to the Project 2013 SDK icons (see Figure 5). Figure 5. Using the renamed links in the Start view Install the Apps for Office and SharePoint 2013 SDK, and similarly rename the Start screen links. Install the SharePoint 2013 SDK, and similarly rename the Start screen links. Figure 6 shows the Microsoft SDKs group with the renamed links in the All apps view. Figure 6. Using the renamed links for all three SDKs in the All apps view In future releases, the Office, SharePoint, and Project SDK downloads will be reconfigured so that they install with non-conflicting link names on Windows 8.  

Lync Online: OneNote Sharing Feature

Using Lync and OneNote, an Office 365 user can take notes during a Lync Meeting. In addition, other meeting participants can see and add to these notes during the meeting. Users can also take private notes and, if the user also has Outlook, he or she can include notes in the meeting request, allowing users to preview them, add their own notes, and prepare for the meeting accordingly.   Author : Alexandra Lise Publication date : November 6, 2012 Product version : Lync Online   Lync’s sharing feature gives Office 365 users with OneNote a way to share notes with colleagues in different locations during an ad hoc (IM, audio, and/or video) conversation or a scheduled Lync Meeting. Collaboration features allow others to contribute to the notes. And, with Outlook and OneNote, Lync Online users can send out notes in a meeting request for attendees to preview. Guidance First, help Lync Online users set up a sharing session , by pointing them to the following topics: Set up a Lync Meeting Explains how to schedule an online meeting by using Outlook or Lync Web Scheduler. Start an impromptu Lync Meeting Explains how to invite one person or a group of people into a Lync IM conversation and add audio and/or video. Next, teach users to add notes to a meeting request and/or Lync Meeting by following the steps at Use shared and private notes in a Lync Meeting . Finally, make sure users know how to let others edit the notes and also how to save notes from Lync. Edit notes together To give control to another person, on the sharing bar at the top of your meeting window, click Give Control , and then either click an individual attendee or click Give Control Automatically to grant control to anyone who requests it during the sharing session. Take back control at any time by clicking Give Control again, and then clicking the either the name of the person who has control or Give Control Automatically if it’s selected. Save notes To save notes during a Lync sharing session, pause on the presentation (monitor) icon, click the Manage Presentable Content button, click More , and then select the saving option. Lync’s sharing and collaboration tools combine with OneNote’s ability to keep track of information by giving Office 365 users with both programs a way to share notes during sharing sessions with large and small audiences, remote users, and in scheduled or impromptu settings and to work with colleagues to capture evolving ideas and to collect information from different experts. Additional Resources To learn more, check out the following articles: Download the Lync 2013 for Office 365 Sharing and Collaboration Quick Reference Introduction to the Lync Meeting Window Check the Lync 2013 for Office 365 Help at office.com for related training and videos, coming soon. Keywords: Lync Meeting, OneNote, notes, sharing